Fresh fish sold here. A historical perspective on supply chains in frontier markets

Over the past few years I have worked on a variety of supply chains in far flung places: Moscow in the transition years looking to build a series of distribution networks; India and the Rushikonda fishing community; Zambia and herdsmen taking their livestock to the abattoir and on to tanneries. All of these examples are distant from the highly sophisticated supply chains of the developed world. And yet, as I look back through history, I note that many of the emerging supply chains of frontier markets find echoes of their development in a number of industries that were born in the industrial revolution.  Continue reading

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The Delhi Mumbai Dedicated Freight Corridor (DFC)

The building of Regional powerhouses creates world class infrastructure and, accelerates industrial clusters and specialisation. However, there is an impact on the Informal Economy. The Delhi Mumbai Dedicated freight Corridor is another case in point.[i]

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Roadside communities in frontier markets

One of the greatest challenges facing logistics and supply chain efforts in frontier markets is the existence and quality of the roads. The World Bank and others have generated a number of useful Reports on spatial modelling taking into account expanding urban areas as well as how best to develop connectivity for remote rural communities. What about those in between – the people who sell and the communities who live alongside roads all over Sub Saharan Africa?

What happens to drive-thru communities?

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Innovation is a two way street

And I shall sell you sell you  
Sell you of course, my dear, and you’ll sell me.
Elizabeth Bishop

In her regular FT Weekend Magazine article [17/03/2012], Gillian Tett demonstrates again her grasp of the new economic realities with an illustration of the fact that business with emerging and developing markets is a two way street. Referring to the cultural minefield around the contradictions of modern aid, Gillian Tett argues that this has to be seen as a two way exchange which does almost as much – if not more – to help the wealthy nations as well as the poor.

Frugal innovation means business

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From supply chains all about take, make and throw away to sustainability

The UN Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru from the 1 to the 12th December is all about how best to adapt to the mounting facts – a change in the climate is taking its toll. Take a look at the periodic table and highlight the state of play. A lot of these elements are not going to last for ever.

Today in the Financial Times high energy costs in the EU are closing aluminium plants – 11 smelters out of 24 across the EU have closed since 2007 as output has fallen by 40 per cent. And this is despite the fact that demand for aluminium is surging as it becomes the metal of choice for manufacturing light weight cars and ships to reduce fuel consumption and is favoured by environmentalists because it is easy to recycle.

How many more elements could end up like this?

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Bikes don’t grow on trees. They do now …

Years back I asked my Father for a bike and, in a homily that introduced the idea of the Saturday job, he told me that they didn’t grow on trees. They do now. On the outskirts of Lusaka in Zambia next years crop of bicycles is being watered by Benjamin Banda: “we planted this bamboo last year and the stems are taller than me. When it is ready, we will cut it and cure it and then, turn it into frames.”

Introducing the Bamboo Zambike

Introducing the Bamboo Zambike

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Wilberforce’s unfinished business

David Murden of the And Albert Foundation has worked tirelessly for many years to progress a trade based initiative in Ghana. The core idea is a transformative project with a focus on trees, trade and training as a means to deliver sustainable communities with the potential to offer insights that can apply across Africa.

This film has been prepared as one in a series to highlight work to date and, future project priorities. Here, David has worked with film makers Stephen Rainer and Ross Cresswell again to explain the Wilberforce One Project. This project is all about raising funds to build boats that can work the Volta river system in Ghana to deliver vital medical supplies and offer greater connectivity to remote village communities. Sponsored by the Hull Paragon Rotary Club (District 1270) this project is making massive progress as part of what David has called “Wilberforce’s unfinished business”.

The Wilberforce One Project is the first step in a far more ambitious approach. The idea is to resource and complete with specialist International and local partners:

  • Mapping Process 1. To map the Volta River and trace the traditional slave trade route. This will reveal a variety of archaeological and tribal artefacts as well as help to build on AAFs extensive musical and folkloric archive. AAF have been working across a wide area to build strong partnerships with local people and this extends to:
  • Mapping Process 2. To map the Volta River to understand the village networks around the river systems as a means to build a viable trade corridor going forward. Logistics specialists will be engaged to complete the work using transformational logistics principles and partner experience. This to include:
    • Proposals on a Hub and Spoke network. One in ten or twenty villages would be developed to operate as a catalyst for agricultural storage and information; healthcare; learning; financial services and connectivity.
    • The Trees; Trade and Training project progressed.
    • A Business Case to deliver a clear Investment proposal with a clear Social Return on Investment.

This mapping effort would be filmed and footage used for educational purposes as well as investment decision support.

AAF are working with a number of partners to deliver these projects and more detail will follow. Meanwhile, here’s the film:

Press: WILBERFORCE ONE

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A Trade Mission to Peru ready to go

In December 2014, Adam Budgen (a world renowned Orthopaedic Surgeon; partner in the White Rose Clinic; North Yorkshire Orthopaedic Specialists; lecturer at Hull York Medical School and Founder of the K’Anchay Nan Foundation) and Robert Bell (CEO of Archomai, Fellow of Durham University Business School; Reader at Aberdeen Business School; a member of the Steering Group at the University of Hull Logistics Institute and a founder, with Lord Prescott of the Northern Gateway Initiative) will visit Peru as part of the NGI trade mission.

Adam will be advancing the work of his Foundation on Education and, laying the groundwork for a Clinic to meet local needs; Rob will be speaking about NGI; the transformational agenda and, the potential for close links between Peru and the North of England. This Trade Mission is being supported by the UKTI. Lord Prescott, former Deputy Prime Minister for the UK Government and co-founder of NGI will follow with his presence at the United Nations Climate Change Conference. Lord Prescott is recognised Internationally for the role he has played both in the successful negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol on climate change resulting in the Treaty and on the post-Kyoto agenda leading up to the Peru Conference.

The following notes supplement the video discussion between Rob and Adam ahead of the trip. Continue reading

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Time to transform Logistics and Supply Chain thinking and practice?

In a matter of weeks, a little known economist based at the Paris School of Economics has moved from obscurity to rock star status. Thomas Picketty’s Capital (655 pages) has created a storm: Martin Wolf of the Financial Times called the book “enthralling”; The New York Times puts Capital in the Twenty-First Century in the company of Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations and John Maynard Keynes General Theory. Justin Fox in the HBR likens it to a big river — muddy and occasionally meandering, but with a powerful current that keeps pulling you along, plus lots of interesting sights along the way. Paul Krugman likens it to a eureka moment. It is the best-selling book on Amazon. Perhaps the Logistics and Supply Chain discipline is ripe for a similar challenge. Continue reading

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Rob Bell’s Talk at Aston University 25th March 2014

This is an uncut workshop session with Masters students from Aston University.

CLICK HERE

Many thanks to the invitation to speak from Dr Aristides Matopulos.

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